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Common vision problems

To see an object clearly, light reflected off the object passes through your eye to focus on your retina. Common vision problems occur when the light fails to focus correctly on your retina, so the object you are looking at appears blurred.

This section looks at the most common vision problems:

These vision problems can usually be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. ACUVUE® Brand Contact Lenses will give you clear vision and are designed to deliver exceptional contact lens comfort.

If you suspect you have one of these common vision problems:

To find out more about each condition, click on the tabs above.

Short-sightedness and long-sightedness

Short-sightedness and long-sightedness are very common vision problems that can usually be corrected with glasses or contact lenses.

Short-sightedness

If you’re short-sighted (myopic), you will have trouble seeing objects at a distance.

Your vision is clear when you look at things up close, but further away objects become out of focus or blurred. This can affect your vision when you are driving, playing sports or trying to recognise people and objects in the distance. This in turn can lead to eyestrain, headaches and fatigue.

Short-sightedness (myopia) occurs when your eye is too long from front to back or your cornea’s curve is too steep. As a result, light focuses in front of the retina, making objects in the distance appear blurred.

You can become short-sighted at any age, but it usually starts around puberty. It's unusual for it to occur after the age of thirty, but older people with cataracts can become short-sighted.

Long-sightedness

If you are long-sighted (hyperopic), you can see objects clearly at a distance but find it hard to focus on things close to you. In more severe cases, it can be difficult to focus on objects at any distance. Long-sightedness (hyperopia) can interfere with day-to-day activities, such as reading, writing and other precise, close-up tasks. This can lead to eyestrain, headaches and fatigue.

Long-sightedness occurs when the eye is too short from front to back, or the cornea’s curve is too shallow. Light is then focused behind the retina instead of on it, resulting in blurred vision.

Most children are born long-sighted, but their vision usually corrects itself as their eyes develop¹. Adults can become long-sighted, which is often more noticeable as they approach middle age.

Additionally there is another long-sightedness, which is age-related and is called presbyopia.

Diagnosing short-sightedness and long-sightedness

How short-sighted or long-sighted you are depends on the distance your vision starts to blur. This is measured when you have an eye test. The test results will determine your prescription for glasses or contact lenses.

If you suspect you are short-sighted or long-sighted, you should visit an Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist for a professional eye test. Use our online search tool to find an Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist near you.

Contact lenses for short-sightedness and long-sightedness

Most people who are short-sighted or long-sighted can correct their vision with contact lenses. These contact lenses are shaped to direct light to your retina, so you can see people and objects clearly at all distances.

For daily disposable contact lenses, ask your Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist about 1•DAY ACUVUE® TRUEYE® or 1•DAY ACUVUE® MOIST®. For reusable lenses ask about ACUVUE® OASYS®.

Find out how to get a Free Trial Pair of ACUVUE® Brand Contact Lenses here.

Astigmatism

Astigmatism is a common condition that can result in blurred or distorted vision at all distances, varying with the strength of the astigmatism. It can affect people at any age. People with astigmatism are often short-sighted or long-sighted as well.

What causes astigmatism?

The images your eye transmits to your brain are only clear if rays of light passing into your eye focus on a single point on your retina, at the back of your eye.

Astigmatism is caused when either the surface of the eye (the cornea) or the lens behind it, is an irregular shape. Instead of being round, it is shaped more like a rugby ball. As a result, the light doesn’t focus correctly on the retina and the image is blurred.

What are the symptoms of astigmatism?

Astigmatism can cause blurred vision when you are trying to focus on activities that require you to see objects at long distances, such as road signs. It can also affect your vision for close activities, such as reading or sewing. If left untreated, astigmatism can lead to headaches, fatigue, squinting and pain in the muscles around your eye.

How do I know if I have astigmatism?

If you suspect you have astigmatism you should visit your Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist for an eye test.

You can find an Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist near you here.

Your Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist will use an astigmatism chart to help determine the curvature of your cornea or lens. An abnormal curvature will sharply focus parts of the image onto your retina, while blurring others.

Take the astigmatism test at home

Astigmatism

Follow these five steps:

  • 1. If you wear glasses or contact lenses, put them on.
  • 2. Sit about 35 cm (14 inches) away from your computer screen.
  • 3. Look at the chart with your hand covering one eye.
  • 4. How do the lines appear? (Are they all equally clear and sharp?)
  • 5. Follow these steps again to test the other eye.

What do your results mean?

If you do not have astigmatism, all of the lines will appear sharply focused and equally dark. You may have astigmatism if some sets of lines appear sharp and dark, while others are blurred and lighter. Whatever your result, you must get a confirmed diagnosis from an Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist.

How can astigmatism be corrected?

If your Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist confirms you have astigmatism, don’t worry. Nearly half of the population has some form of astigmatism and it can usually be corrected with glasses or ‘toric’ contact lenses1.

Soft, toric contact lenses correct astigmatism by compensating for the individual differences in the shape of your eye, enabling light to focus correctly on your retina. If you are short-sighted or long-sighted as well as having astigmatism, toric contact lenses will correct these vision problems at the same time as correcting astigmatism.

ACUVUE® Brand Contact Lenses for astigmatism

For clear vision with astigmatism, your contact lenses need to stay in place and not rotate or shift out of position. ACUVUE® Brand Contact Lenses for astigmatism achieve this with their unique Accelerated Stabilisation Design ( ASD). ASD technology ensures that however you move your head or eyes, your vision stays stable, crisp and clear.

For ACUVUE® contact lenses with ASD technology, ask your Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist about:

Find out how to get a Free Trial Pair of ACUVUE® Brand Contact Lenses here.

Presbyopia

Presbyopia is an age-related condition that affects almost everyone¹. As you get older, you may find it harder to focus up close, especially in low light.

What causes presbyopia?

As you approach middle age, the lens of your eye can lose its elasticity and become less flexible. Light is then focused behind your retina instead of on it, which can result in blurred vision.

What are the symptoms of presbyopia?

Presbyopia makes it harder to focus on near objects and to adjust your focus quickly on objects at different distances. This can affect your vision for everyday activities such as reading print. The print may be blurred up close and you may find yourself holding books, magazines and menus at a distance to see the print more clearly.

Without vision correction, presbyopia can lead to headaches and eye fatigue.

How do I know if I have presbyopia?

If you find you are having difficulty focusing, you should visit an Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist for an eye test and confirmed diagnosis.

You should have eye tests more frequently after the age of 40 to check for age-related conditions such as age-related macular degeneration and presbyopia.

You can find an Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist near you here.

How can presbyopia be corrected?

Most people with presbyopia can correct their vision with multifocal glasses or contact lenses.

Another approach to presbyopia is monovision, whereby one eye has a contact lens to see up close while the other eye has a lens to see far away. Depending on your distance vision, a single lens may be all you need.

Common vision problems

To see an object clearly, light reflected off the object passes through your eye to focus on your retina. Common vision problems occur when the light fails to focus correctly on your retina, so the object you are looking at appears blurred.

This section looks at the most common vision problems:

These vision problems can usually be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. ACUVUE®Brand Contact Lenses will give you clear vision and are designed to deliver exceptional contact lens comfort.

If you suspect you have one of these common vision problems:

To find out more about each condition, click on the tabs above.

Short-sightedness and long-sightedness

Short-sightedness and long-sightedness are very common vision problems that can usually be corrected with glasses or contact lenses.

Short-sightedness

If you’re short-sighted (myopic), you will have trouble seeing objects at a distance.

Your vision is clear when you look at things up close, but further away objects become out of focus or blurred. This can affect your vision when you are driving, playing sports or trying to recognise people and objects in the distance. This in turn can lead to eyestrain, headaches and fatigue.

Short-sightedness (myopia) occurs when your eye is too long from front to back or your cornea’s curve is too steep. As a result, light focuses in front of the retina, making objects in the distance appear blurred.

You can become short-sighted at any age, but it usually starts around puberty. It's unusual for it to occur after the age of thirty, but older people with cataracts can become short-sighted.

Long-sightedness

If you are long-sighted (hyperopic), you can see objects clearly at a distance but find it hard to focus on things close to you. In more severe cases, it can be difficult to focus on objects at any distance. Long-sightedness (hyperopia) can interfere with day-to-day activities, such as reading, writing and other precise, close-up tasks. This can lead to eyestrain, headaches and fatigue.

Long-sightedness occurs when the eye is too short from front to back, or the cornea’s curve is too shallow. Light is then focused behind the retina instead of on it, resulting in blurred vision.

Most children are born long-sighted, but their vision usually corrects itself as their eyes develop¹. Adults can become long-sighted, which is often more noticeable as they approach middle age.

Additionally there is another long-sightedness, which is age-related and is called presbyopia.

Diagnosing short-sightedness and long-sightedness

How short-sighted or long-sighted you are depends on the distance your vision starts to blur. This is measured when you have an eye test. The test results will determine your prescription for glasses or contact lenses.

If you suspect you are short-sighted or long-sighted, you should visit an Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist for a professional eye test. Use our online search tool to find an Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist near you.

Contact lenses for short-sightedness and long-sightedness

Most people who are short-sighted or long-sighted can correct their vision with contact lenses. These contact lenses are shaped to direct light to your retina, so you can see people and objects clearly at all distances.

For daily disposable contact lenses, ask your Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist about 1•DAY ACUVUE® TRUEYE® or 1•DAY ACUVUE® MOIST®. For reusable lenses ask about ACUVUE® OASYS®.

Find out how to get a Free Trial Pair of ACUVUE® Brand Contact Lenses here.

Astigmatism

Astigmatism is a common condition that can result in blurred or distorted vision at all distances, varying with the strength of the astigmatism. It can affect people at any age. People with astigmatism are often short-sighted or long-sighted as well.

What causes astigmatism?

The images your eye transmits to your brain are only clear if rays of light passing into your eye focus on a single point on your retina, at the back of your eye.

Astigmatism is caused when either the surface of the eye (the cornea) or the lens behind it, is an irregular shape. Instead of being round, it is shaped more like a rugby ball. As a result, the light doesn’t focus correctly on the retina and the image is blurred.

What are the symptoms of astigmatism?

Astigmatism can cause blurred vision when you are trying to focus on activities that require you to see objects at long distances, such as road signs. It can also affect your vision for close activities, such as reading or sewing. If left untreated, astigmatism can lead to headaches, fatigue, squinting and pain in the muscles around your eye.

How do I know if I have astigmatism?

If you suspect you have astigmatism you should visit your Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist for an eye test.

You can find an Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist near you here.

Your Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist will use an astigmatism chart to help determine the curvature of your cornea or lens. An abnormal curvature will sharply focus parts of the image onto your retina, while blurring others.

Take the astigmatism test at home

Astigmatism

Follow these five steps:

  • 1. If you wear glasses or contact lenses, put them on.
  • 2. Sit about 35 cm (14 inches) away from your computer screen.
  • 3. Look at the chart with your hand covering one eye.
  • 4. How do the lines appear? (Are they all equally clear and sharp?)
  • 5. Follow these steps again to test the other eye.

What do your results mean?

If you do not have astigmatism, all of the lines will appear sharply focused and equally dark. You may have astigmatism if some sets of lines appear sharp and dark, while others are blurred and lighter. Whatever your result, you must get a confirmed diagnosis from an Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist.

How can astigmatism be corrected?

If your Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist confirms you have astigmatism, don’t worry. Nearly half of the population has some form of astigmatism and it can usually be corrected with glasses or ‘toric’ contact lenses1.

Soft, toric contact lenses correct astigmatism by compensating for the individual differences in the shape of your eye, enabling light to focus correctly on your retina. If you are short-sighted or long-sighted as well as having astigmatism, toric contact lenses will correct these vision problems at the same time as correcting astigmatism.

ACUVUE® Brand Contact Lenses for astigmatism

For clear vision with astigmatism, your contact lenses need to stay in place and not rotate or shift out of position. ACUVUE® Brand Contact Lenses for astigmatism achieve this with their unique Accelerated Stabilisation Design ( ASD). ASD technology ensures that however you move your head or eyes, your vision stays stable, crisp and clear.

For ACUVUE® contact lenses with ASD technology, ask your Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist about:

Find out how to get a Free Trial Pair of ACUVUE® Brand Contact Lenses here.

Presbyopia

Presbyopia is an age-related condition that affects almost everyone¹. As you get older, you may find it harder to focus up close, especially in low light.

What causes presbyopia?

As you approach middle age, the lens of your eye can lose its elasticity and become less flexible. Light is then focused behind your retina instead of on it, which can result in blurred vision.

What are the symptoms of presbyopia?

Presbyopia makes it harder to focus on near objects and to adjust your focus quickly on objects at different distances. This can affect your vision for everyday activities such as reading print. The print may be blurred up close and you may find yourself holding books, magazines and menus at a distance to see the print more clearly.

Without vision correction, presbyopia can lead to headaches and eye fatigue.

How do I know if I have presbyopia?

If you find you are having difficulty focusing, you should visit an Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist for an eye test and confirmed diagnosis.

You should have eye tests more frequently after the age of 40 to check for age-related conditions such as age-related macular degeneration and presbyopia.

You can find an Eye Care Practitioner/Optometrist near you here.

How can presbyopia be corrected?

Most people with presbyopia can correct their vision with multifocal glasses or contact lenses.

Another approach to presbyopia is monovision, whereby one eye has a contact lens to see up close while the other eye has a lens to see far away. Depending on your distance vision, a single lens may be all you need.